Last edited by Samura
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

5 edition of Intellectual properties and the protection of fictional characters found in the catalog.

Intellectual properties and the protection of fictional characters

copyright, trademark, or unfair competition?

by Dorothy J. Howell

  • 377 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Quorum Books in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Copyright -- Motion pictures -- United States.,
    • Copyright -- Caricatures and cartoons -- United States.,
    • Trademarks -- Law and legislation -- United States.,
    • Competition, Unfair -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [189]-196) and index.

      StatementDorothy J. Howell.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKF3050 .H69 1990
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiv, 209 p. ;
      Number of Pages209
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2220665M
      ISBN 100899305067
      LC Control Number89049434

      In an earlier version of this book was submitted as a thesis to the Intellectual Property Law Unit of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, in fulfilment of the requirements for obtaining the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. the book has been updated to December Intellectual Property Summary: Everything You Need to Know. An intellectual property summary covers what intellectual property, or IP, is and the rights and protections associated with it. 3 min read.

        The film Escape from Tomorrow is set in a Disney park and was filmed completely without permission. As much as everyone at the Sundance premier thought it was going to get sued, Disney never filed a lawsuit. Legal experts observe that the director.   of o results for Books: Law: Intellectual Property Mind Your Business: A Workbook to Grow Your Creative Passion Into a Full-time Gig

      Intellectual Property Laws to Protect Fictional Literary and Pictorial Characters” (Feb. ) 44 Stan. L. Rev. at ; Dorothy Howell, Intellectual Properties and the Protection of Fictional Characters, .   When protecting intellectual property extends too far. Although the theft of intellectual property represents a real problem in some sectors (e.g. music, motion pictures, software, etc.), the extension of protecting intellectual property rights into other important sectors, such as food and medicine, has become a highly controversial issue.


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Intellectual properties and the protection of fictional characters by Dorothy J. Howell Download PDF EPUB FB2

The article Protection Of Graphic Characters provides an overview of the protection of characters and general guidelines for protection of a graphic character that is depicted by a cartoon or other graphic representation, such as Mickey Mouse or Superman.

This article will focus on the protection available for a "fictional character" (also referred to as a "literary character"), such as. In this pioneering volume, Howell addresses the extent to which fictional characters are legally recognized and protected as intellectual property.

Through a judicious selection of cases chosen for their bearing on the popular arts, the author reviews the basic legal principles involved--copyright, trademark, unfair competition, and contract Author: Dorothy J. Howell. This volume addresses the extent to which fictional characters are legally recognized and protected as intellectual property.

The author reviews the basic legal principles involved--copyright, trademark, unfair competition, and contract law, analyzes their applications to fictional characters. and proposes reforms aimed at further protecting. Get this from a library. Intellectual properties and the protection of fictional characters: copyright, trademark, or unfair competition?.

[Dorothy J Howell]. Intellectual Properties and the Protection of Fictional Characters value to the lawyer advising her author-client and to the law researcher seeking to unravel the tangled web of legal protection for fictional characters. The book has an excellent index, complete tables of cases and fine lists of up-to-date primary and secondary sources.

Protection of Intellectual Property Rights- Fictional Characters. particularly if there might be a plausibility to utilize the character in book spin-offs, or for authorizing the utilization of the character for films, TV programming, electronic or other media or marketing.

for copyright protection of fictional characters, the character. PROTECTION OF GRAPHIC CHARACTERS. Suppose a writer and an artist are developing a comic book project.

The main character is based on an idea that the creators believe has enormous commercial potential; not just as a character in a comic book, but hopefully in other media formats and merchandising activities.

'Da 5 Bloods' Star Isiah Whitlock Jr. Reveals Spike Lee Allows You ‘Room to Play and Improvise’. Legal Use and Intellectual Property Protection of Disney Characters; The Disney Group and Walt Disney have created a series of extremely memorable and beloved fictional characters in modern culture.

the original book, has long since lapsed into the public domain. It. Get this from a library. Intellectual properties and the protection of fictional characters: copyright, trademark, or unfair competition?. [Dorothy J Howell] -- In this pioneering volume, Howell addresses the extent to which fictional characters are legally recognized and protected as intellectual property.

“The past folds accordion-like into the present. Different media have different event horizons—for the written word, three millennia; for recorded sound, a century and a half—and within their time frames the old becomes as accessible as the new. For fictional characters in the public domain (e.g., Count Dracula and Snow White), trademark protection is not available.

Other fictional characters may not. Certain rights are granted to the person who owns an intellectual property. Here is a brief overview about such rights.

According to the World Intellectual Property Organization statistics,concentration of filing for IP protection varied across geographical regions. Willinsky?s bravura tour through this history shows that learning gave rise to our idea of intellectual property while remaining distinct from, if not wholly uncompromised by, the commercial economy that this concept inspired, making it clear that today?s push for marketable intellectual property threatens the very nature of the quest for.

“Intellectual Property” (IP) are those assets of a business that are intellectual–in other words, not physical–such as copyrights, patents, and trademarks.

But many business owners mix up the different types of IP, which makes it difficult for them to ask the right questions & learn how to make decisions to protect their creations.

Please Note: This event has already taken place. Intellectual Property Protection and Exploitation of Fictional Characters. Friday, Septem PM to PM Boston Bar Association - 16 Beacon Street, Boston, MA. Intellectual property (IP) is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect.

There are many types of intellectual property, and some countries recognize more than others. The most well-known types are copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade precursors to some types of intellectual property existed in societies such as Ancient Rome, but the.

Good information, but it didn’t quite cover what I needed to know. I have written a book, a fictional Western, and in my book the main character meets up with Wild Bill Hickok and Bat Masterson. Their roles are very very minor, but how would I cover that in the disclaimer, the fact that a couple of the people in the book were real characters.

Dorothy J. Howell is the author of Intellectual Properties and the Protection of Fictional Characters ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published The current movement toward unified, global intellectual property rights has gained considerable momentum.

U.S. government agencies are leading the movement, and most market-oriented countries are supporting the U.S.

position in the General Agreement on. fictional characters. Sections III through V examine specific examples of how various laws have been applied to fictional characters. Section VI addresses the limitations on character owners’ rights, and explores the ways in which characters or their constituent elements .Protecting your intellectual property makes it easier to take legal action against anyone who steals or copies it.

Types of protection. The type of protection you can get depends on what you’ve. Keyboard Logger: Hardware or software that records every keystroke on a computer, usually for nefarious purposes and without the user’s knowledge. Keyboard loggers .